Top 20 All-Time Hollywood

Every year there are new blockbuster movies and potential classics that audiences can enjoy for generations to come. If you are looking for a list of great movies – arguably the best movies Hollywood has ever made, then start with this list of 20 best movies as your guide.

The American Film Institute and other critically respected organizations update their “Best” lists every year. Though the rankings may change, and there are occasionally new entries toward the top, here are the consistently ranked top Hollywood movies.

20 – To Kill A Mockingbird. Gregory Peck give an unforgettable performance in this adaptation of Harper Lee’s classic novel. His search for justice has inspired and influence courtroom dramas every since.

19 – E.T. No other film captured the imagination of young audiences in the 1980’s than E.T. This extra-terrestrial teamed up with Drew Barrymore to form the best chemistry between child and alien that the big screen has ever seen.

18 – Alien. Director Ridley Scott’s best film to date. Spawning multiple sequels that never lived up to the quality of this break-out film. A must-see for any sci-fi fan.

17 – Rear Window. How many of Hitchcock’s films usually make “best-of” lists? We could easily put five of them up here. But James Stewart’s performance is unbelievable.

16 – Unforgiven. This movie handed Clint Eastwood an Oscar for Best Picture and remains a classic revenge tale.

15 – Pulp Fiction. A more recent addition to the American Film Classic library. This put Quentin Tarrantino on the map and inspired a generation of screenwriters.

14 – King Kong. A classic, and innovative at the time for this use of stop motion animation in the much-copied Empire Stat Building climax.

13 – 12 Angry Men. Another courtroom drama for the ages. Shot almost entirely in a jury deliberation room, this movie proves a play can be adapted effectively for the screen.

12 – Annie Hall. A comedy classic that won Woody Allen a Best Director award from the Academy, even though he did not show up to accept. This movie became a template for off-beat romantic comedies that still works today.

11 – Rocky. If the Rocky series had ended after the first movie, this would still be a sports classic. This humble love story about a fighter who finally gets his shot never gets old.

10 – Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. A breakthrough in animation on the scale of Pixar’s achievements, and even greater considering the lack of technology. This movie is still beautiful.

9 – Casablanca. The story of a love-torn man during World War Two. Proof that the lives of two people can have a great impact on the entire world.

8 – Chinatown. Roman Polanski’s epic film about a private eye played by a young Jack Nicholson who gets in over his head.

7 – North By Northwest. Another Hitchcock movie that stands the test of time. A caper that unfolds when the wrong man is targeted.

6 – Wizard of Oz. An epic that every family can watch and enjoy together no matter how young or old.

5 – Schindler’s List. Steven Spielberg’s classic story of how one man saved so many from the horrors of the concentration camps.

4 – Titanic. James Cameron’s epic story of love caught in the middle of a world famous disaster.

3 – Gone With the Wind. One of the most famous adaptations. This Civil War drama remains a staple of best Hollywood movies lists.

2 – Citizen Kane. Orson Welles’ story of a fallen titan broke the rules of story and directing.

1 – The Godfather. The end all be all of gangster films. Francis Ford Coppola’s classic is the story of a mafia family that still feels fresh today.

The Holiday Season Mood With A Christmas Movie

Apart of Christmas tree, decorations, parties and gifts, there is something that adds a special atmosphere to the holiday season: Christmas movies.

Almost all adults have sweet memories related to a Christmas movie; a movie that remains favorite and have – sometimes just for a second – a special flavour: the taste of childhood.

We are now adults and know that movies related to Christmas create a fun atmosphere and also teach moral lessons to our children.

When I was a child, the most watched Christmas movies in Belgium were 1950’s American movies (Hollywood style obviously) or French films.

For twenty-five years, our society evolved and the quality of Christmas TV broadcasts in French-speaking Europe has decreased. Movies of Christmas Eve have generally been replaced by musical broadcasts whose quality was not the best. Lots of TV companies also tend to offer hundred times viewed movies: for instance, TVI will display Harry Potter 1 and 2 on December 24th while we were expecting watching Harry Potter 3 or 4…

However, thanks to the Internet and DVD stores, I have the opportunity to watch the movies I love instead of those proposed by TV companies.

Here are some examples of beautiful and/or humorous Christmas movies I love:

“Bishop’s Wife”

A nice movie in the Hollywood tradition!

While working on plans to build a cathedral financed by a rich widow, Henry Broghaman, an Episcopal bishop neglects his family and prays for divine guidance.

His prayers are heard and Dudley, an angel, is sent to help him. The mission of the angel is not to assist with the building, but in his relations with his family that he is neglecting.

But Dudley falls in love with the bishop’s wife and Broghaman is jealous…

French title of this movie is “Honi soit qui mal y pense” (Old English: shame upon him who thinks evil of it).

“The sound of music”

This movie tells the story of Maria, a young Austrian who was studying to become a nun. She was hired by Captain Von Trapp, a widower to be the governess to his seven children.

The children were initially hostile to her but finally became her friends when she thaught them the joy of singing.

Captain Von Trapp and Maria fell in love and get married. When the Nazis took power in Austria, Captain Von Trapp and his whole family fled the country and found refuge in Switzerland.

This romantic musical comedy is one of French-speaking European favorite movies.

“3615 Code Pere Noel”

Thomas is a child who has everything: a mother who loves him, a cheeky grandfather, thousands of different and expensive toys.

Thomas is a clever child and on Christmas Eve, while planning of catching, he communicates with him through the Minitel (the French ancestor of the instant messenger).

Unfortunately, the alleged Santa Claus is a psychopath employee that his mother just laid off. A few hours later, the false Santa penetrates Thomas castle and the nightmare begins.

The English title of this thriller is “Dial Code Santa Claus”

“Le Pere Noel est une Ordure” (Santa Claus is a junk)

“SOS Distress and Friendship” is a charity association run by Mrs Musquin. While she decided to celebrate Christmas Eve with her family, Pierre and Therese, will spend their evening the phone and try to give some hope to desperate people.

They do not know that this Christmas Eve will get them into silly accidents as well as unannounced visits of desperate, and sometimes, dangerous people. The evening will turn into a humorous nightmare.

The American remake of this movie is “Mixed Nuts”.

“Scrooged”

This is a modern adaptation of the Dickens tale. Francis Cross, who is the program director of a TV station, is a disagreeable person.

During the Christmas Eve, three ghosts will take care of them and teach him how to become a pleasant person by showing him the good side of life.

This movie is also a nice message that teaches to the world the real meaning of Christmas.

“National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation”

The return of Griswold Family!

25000 bulbs on the front of the house blinding the neighbors, unbearable related family, a burning Christmas tree, a charred Christmas turkey, hostile neighbors, a removed Christmas bonus and a lot of unexpected accidents, this is the Christmas of the Griswold family.

I watched this movie for the first time in the late 80’s and never have enough of it! I even bought the DVD in order to have the opportunity to create a hysteric Christmas atmosphere any other day of the year!

“Surviving Christmas”

Tired of the customs associated with Christmas and New Year? What about being paid $250,000 to to celebrate a traditional Christmas Eve with an unknown person?

Americans Love Good Car Movies

There seems to be something about car movies that Americans really like. Have you noticed all the movies that are primarily based on cars? They’re all over! Movies like Bullitt and Smokey and the Bandit are classic ones that have spawned their own generation of car fanatics.

More modern movies such as Gone In 60 Seconds (2001) and Redline have taken a new twist on the plotlines with stealing cars and racing exotic cars. Gone In 60 Seconds (2001) is actually a remake of the 1975 version that spawned the Eleanor (which was originally a yellow ’73 Mustang Fastback). Most people don’t know that. Personally, I enjoy old car movies like this. I like classic cars and I really like the film style of the ’60s and ’70s.

Now our car movies sport street racing and gang activity (The Fast and the Furious, 2 Fast 2 Furious, The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift, Fast and Furious). That isn’t to say, however, that these movies are trash and not worth viewing – quite the opposite, in fact. These are great movies that appeal to a whole different generation of car enthusiasts. Actors like Steve McQueen have been replaced by Brian Walker (if they were ever to do a remake of Bullitt I think Daniel Craig would play the role of Bullitt) and Vin Diesel.

Incidentally, Vin Diesel has a name that’s quite cut out for the automotive industry. Vin, meaning Vehicle Identification Number and Diesel, which is a fuel type. Go figure.

Move Over Movies

Wide Awake Face Lift eliminates the fear of anesthesia in that requires no major anesthesia. Now with the introduction of 3D facelift, there is a new breakthrough in facelift procedure through reversing facial fat loss (the 3rd dimension of aging) thus preventing the “too pulled” and done look that is common with a traditional facelift.

Gravity has been blamed as the main cause of aging but the lesser known and neglected cause has been the fat loss in select areas of the face. The classic facelift pulls the face in only a two-dimensional angle even though the loss of fat in the face causes it to age in the third dimension. The 3D Face Lift breaks tradition of the old facelift by adding the person’s own fat to hollow areas of the face.

The avant-garde procedure takes place with the patient wide-awake using only local anesthesia and, remarkably, sitting up! Following the face lift he takes fat from unwanted areas and then processes and re-injects it into the areas of the face affected by thinning, such as under the eyes and cheeks.

What is more amazing is that our fat harbors a lot of stem cells which when injected under your skin can act as repair cells by producing natural growth factors and rehabilitating sun damaged and aging skin. So more recently, plastic surgeons have been taking advantage of these stem cells from fat, which then repairs volume, aging skin, and the underlying tissue.

The 3D lift is Hollywood’s newest fountain of youth, giving outstanding and progressive results. In about an hour patients look younger, and most importantly natural, after having a procedure that used only local anesthesia!

Hollywood Upcoming Movies

Hollywood, by listening this term, many cinema lovers get fascinated with excitement. Originally, Hollywood is a district in Los Angles in US, which is famous for its film industry. Due to this, now the word Hollywood has become a term for film industry. This film industry has been offering excellent Hollywood upcoming movies to the people from a century. Today also, this industry is on its peak and producing excellent films with latest technologies. People can still be seen reading Hollywood movies reviews keenly and deciding which one of these should be enjoyed first. This industry takes care of the people of every interest by directing and producing films on various themes such as romantic, historical, science fiction, comedy etc. Some of the movies which got a lot of fame are Jurassic Park, Titanic, The Last Samurai etc.

Hollywood video franchising

In this season also, this industry is planning to give some good entertainment packages. According to the latest Hollywood movies news, some of the upcoming movies are – The International, Confession of Shopaholic, Friday the 13th, Fired up etc. All these films are based on different themes and are fully packed with a lot of entertainment. It is quite obvious that it will be difficult to stand up before finishing these films, once you start watching them.

‘The International’ is a film based on corruption. This is a story about a fictional bank that perform corrupt dealings. Then comes an Interpol agent (Clive Owen) teamed with his assistant. The whole story is based on the corruption and its investigation. This is an interesting movie based on interesting theme, especially for those who like detective films. Another name can be taken ‘Confession of Shopaholic’. This is an excellent story based on the struggle of a fun loving girl named Rebecca Bloomwood. She wanted to work with her favorite fashion magazine but could not be successful at first. But later on as a result of her struggle, she started enjoying the taste success. One theme, which is recognized as one of the most important is comedies. Then, how Hollywood can remain untouched with it. An upcoming comedy flick is the ‘Fired up’. This is a story about two boys joining the cheer leader camps. The whole film is based on this.

These interesting films are providing one of the best entertainments to the movie buffs. Perhaps, this is the reason, that the fans of this industry are from all over the world. Hopefully, the class apart entertainment from this side will continue to remain and people will get some more good Hollywood movies news in coming days.

Hollywood Screenwriting

Hollywood screenwriting is a different animal than traditional screenwriting. A metonym for American movies, Hollywood undoubtedly leads the world production of movies, television serials and commercials. It goes without saying that Hollywood is the home for illustrious celebrities in every walk of cinema life. With the establishment of the first studio in the Tinsel town in early 1900s, the sleepy township was suddenly transformed into the production capital of films. As the center was rearing up to go, hundreds of auxiliary industries mushroomed to provide the much needed support. These included film studios, cinematography, singers, music and movie directors, screenwriters, actors, distributors and other members of the crew.

Watch latest Hollywood

Hollywood screenwriting grew in popularity as the film industry galloped unbridled. New themes, novel scripts and kaleidoscopic changes demanded skilled writers who could match their talent with public mandate. Reel life is generally depiction of real life existing during a particular epoch. Thousands of writers of varying expertise flocked the place to give the silver screen a new dimension and try their fortune at the most promising profession. These wordsmiths were an enthusiastic lot and till date, all of them come here starry-eyed and a yearning to win fame and recognition for what they think to be their masterpieces. Some do succeed, but most fade out with passage of time.

The reason for Hollywood screenwriting becoming an almost indomitable work is that the savvy screenwriters are not made of the same mettle as in the days gone by. Most lack the inspiration and many give up before they reach even the lowest rung of the ladder. True, there is a plethora of opportunities available today, like formal training, software to take away a large chunk of the bother of compiling seamless scripts, writing companies to assist the aspirant and the swelling size of the market. Hollywood screenwriting has become a serious business. On an average, there are about a hundred and fifty feature films, dozens of TV movies, and seventy odd TV serials produced annually and more baffling is the fact that a minimum of five scripts are written and paid for, for each of the artistic creativity.

How To Write Screenplays That Hollywood

Do you make the same mistake so many other screenwriters make when writing screenplays? Do you overlook the fact that in order to get produced in Hollywood, you need to write screenplays that Hollywood produces?

I’m not sure where I read this, but I read where the best movie of 2001 to date is “Shrek.” The article went on to describe the reasons why. “Shrek” made more money at the box office and is the longest running movie of any movie released in 2001. Also, “Shrek” covers the largest demographic, as people of all ages go to it (kids, teens, adults and seniors). Perhaps the key thing that has made “Shrek” so popular is word-of-mouth.

“Shrek” and “The Prince of Egypt” are Hollywood-produced movies. What do they contain that your screenplays do not contain? Remember, I am writing about how to write screenplays that get produced; not how to write screenplays.

The first element “Shrek” and “The Prince of Egypt” have that your screenplays should also have is a story with a beginning, a middle and an end. “Shrek” and “The Prince of Egypt” take us from dire beginnings, to riveting middles, to powerful endings that touch our hearts. “Shrek” and “The Prince of Egypt” also track a main character.

“Shrek” and “The Prince of Egypt” introduce us to and immerse us in the main character’s world. They present a dramatic premise. They show us the main character’s fatal flaw which they must overcome if they are to win what they want to win. What they want to win is more dear to them than anything else in their lives at the time. It is a universal “dear”. And as well, what is dear to these main characters is also dear to us. This is one way we are hooked into each movie.

At the end of Act I, in “Shrek” and “The Prince of Egypt” situations occur that devastate the main characters and us. The situations spin the main characters and us around and shoots us and them off into Act II. In Act II, they take the main characters and us through a labyrinth of experiences that pull the main characters to the edge of breaking and us to the edge of our seats. And it is all because we have been transformed from viewers to main characters ourselves.

We think and feel as the main characters think and feel. We’re pulling for them regardless of how reckless they might be. Just about the time, we think all is lost, and we’re going to have to limp off home to mend our wounds, something occurs that brings the main characters new hope. With this newfound hope, we sweat with the main characters as they overcome superhuman odds to win. In the end, we see the main characters transform, and somehow, inside of us, a transformation also takes place. And we go home with a happy heart and a good-feeling mind about ourselves and our lives.

There are a number of less-than-spectacular movies that are churned out of Hollywood each year. The fine point of writing screenplays is contained in the elements and structure that have been described previously. If you are skeptical of this, or if you still feel you write screenplays that Hollywood should produce, then you might want to take time out to study movies that Hollywood has produced. Be certain your screenplay writing contains aspects of the kinds of movies Hollywood produces to give you confidence in your convictions.

You should also read the screenplays of these movies. Once you have accomplished this, outline the movies/screenplays scene-by-scene. By doing this physical and mental activity, you will discover elements of these movies that you otherwise may overlook. In your findings, you will learn about critical turning points that are so crucial for good storytelling. You will also ascertain transformation arcs the main characters go through as they move forward to accomplishing the goals that are set up for them during the execution of the dramatic premises. You will clearly recognize the elements containing universal elements which hook.

Clara Bow Movies Hollywood’s

“She danced even when her feet were not moving” Adolf Zukor

Clara Bow had somewhat of a disheartening beginning to her life having been born to an unhappily married mother who suffered from, the then misunderstood, epileptic fits. Sara Bow, who had previously had her first two babies die prematurely expected the same for her third one. This would not be the case for Clara.

Clara’s father, Robert Bow, was a drunken, verbally and physically abusive father and husband who was unable to hold a steady job and was away most of her childhood. The family lived in poverty and Clara’s mother Sara was forced into work as a prostitute in order to make money for food, often locking Clara in a closet while she entertained customers in their apartment.

Clara’s poor and tattered clothing led the other little girls in her neighborhood to make fun of her. As a result, she decided to make friends with the boys, who immediately took a liking to her “tomboyish” nature.

When she had turned sixteen, in order to escape her troubled life, Clara Bow began modeling for a number of movie magazines. She had often sought personal sanctuary at the movies and after the shows would pose in front of her mirror practicing her favorite actresses gestures and expressions.

This greatly displeased her mother who would often tell Clara that “acting was for whores” and had occasionally come up behind her and threaten to kill her stating “she would be better off dead then an actress in film.” Because of this, Clara did not disclose to her mother her plans to enter a modeling contest for a chance at the cover shot on a 1921 publication of Motion Picture Magazine.

Clara submitted two photographs for the contest and the judges were impressed by how attractively she photographed. She was offered a number of follow-up screen tests which showcased her natural acting ability leading to Clara ultimately winning the contest.

Her first role was in the film Beyond the Rainbow (1922), but her scenes ended up on the cutting room floor leaving Clara feeling completely devastated.

It was at this time her mother began having more serious seizures as a result of her medical problems, and one night she threatened Clara at knife point until falling to the floor from a particularly horrible seizure. This experience would give Clara insomnia and feelings of insecurity for the rest of her life.

In spite of how dreadful life was on the home front for Clara, her career in films started to really take off after being seen on the cover of Motion Picture Magazine. She was given a small part in the film Down to the Sea in Ships (1922) and even though ripped by the critics she caught the eye of producer B. P. Schulberg of Preferred Pictures (soon to become Paramount Pictures), and was off to Hollywood. It didn’t take long for audiences to begin a love affair with the soon to be “It Girl.”

Her magical on screen presence as the first illustrious “flapper” of the roaring twenties had women across America walking, talking, dancing, and dressing like Clara Bow.

Classic Hollywood Romances

Well, does anyone of us ever come to think of Hollywood’s most memorable romance classics spanning decades? As an ardent admirer of romance and the alluring Hollywood musicals, I unmistakably feel my pulses rising with the sheer magic and aura of the timeless romances portrayed so very lovingly in the silver screen of the yesteryears. Be it the ever-touching saga of star-crossed lovers meeting during wartime under the Moorish arches of Rick’s Café American in “Casablanca”, or the sweeping melodrama, “Gone With The Wind”– based on Margaret Mitchell’s bestselling Civil War epic (which defined the term “Hollywood blockbuster”), I have an insatiable appetite for each of them.

Oh how can I ever forget the sweeping emotions of the magic of a shipboard romance which charms a Frenchman and American woman (Charles Boyer and Irene Dunne, respectively) into each other’s arms in the ever-memorable “Love Affair”? Or do you remember that phenomenal romance between Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr in “An Affair To Remember”, where a man and a woman meet on a ship crossing an ocean and fall in love, only to part ways, promising to meet dramatically on the top of Empire State Building, New York (which unfortunately, doesn’t happen later)? Equally unforgettable to my mind is the all-time epic love saga, “Roman Holiday”, which happens to be the most priceless transient romance between a disguised princess and a handsome American reporter (Audrey Hepburn and Gregory Peck, respectively).

When you come to think of candlelight romances, serenading, wooing the beloved or star-crossed epic love sagas, you would obviously mark the romantic chemistry between the lover and his beloved as the quintessential foundation behind these wonderful, witty and immensely touching tales of true love. Interestingly, the success of these blockbusters in romance in Hollywood comes from incorporating core elements of Hollywood (especially the music), classical romance elements and a degree of sentimentality which, again, is quite stylishly sophisticated in nature.

The 50’s and 60’s were the hey days of classic romance in Hollywood, when ethos, pathos, happy endings, heart-wrenching goodbyes and romantic love scenes along with power-packed performances by some of Hollywood’s heartthrobs like Gregory Peck, Audrey Hepburn, Ingrid Bergman, Cary Grant, Clark Gable, Vivien Leigh and Marilyn Monroe were the staple of every young heart. Now, I would rather not attempt this article as a primer of cinematic history comprising the best films of all times from the classic romance genre, for that is the job of an encyclopedia and not that of a human. And these days, you are sure to get plentiful of those online. So I would limit my writing to the discussion of only some of the milestones of our cinematic past, the era and the cultural milieu behind the production of these masterpieces, which again, comes from the sheer love I feel towards these movies.

While today, Warner Bros., Twentieth Century Fox, MGM and Columbia (Sony) are some of the pioneers in Hollywood film production and distribution, in the yesteryears, Paramount Pictures, the longest-lived American movie studio, used to lead the arena of American motion picture production and distribution. Those were the blissful times when the Hollywood studio system produced classic movies embodying a refined, evocative method of storytelling that left something to the audience’s imagination. While this was true right from the early nineteen hundred and thirties’ till the sixties’, the audience those days were fed on films which did adhere to certain standards of discretion and used established cinematic devices to imply what they could not say explicitly. Without an iota of blatant sensory stimulations, the sheer use of compelling stories and characters, snappy dialogue, high production values (including those of cinematography, editing, shot composition, scoring, sets and costuming) and above all, extra-ordinary acting prowess of the stars those days gave birth to some of the most celebrated reel romances of all times, including “Gone With the Wind”, “West Side Story”, “Casablanca”, “Roman Holiday”, “My Fair Lady” and “An Affair to Remember”.

The 40’s, 50’s and 60’s, combined, was also the era producing the greatest silver screen legends like Marlon Brando, Humphrey Bogart, Spencer Tracy, the irresistibly handsome Cary Grant and the super charismatic Gregory Peck, the celebrated smidgens Katharine Hepburn and Bette Davis, Ingrid Bergman, Sofia Lauren, Audrey Hepburn, and the ravishing Greta Garbo and Marilyn Monroe. Interestingly enough, did you know that recently the AFI has ranked the greatest love stories of the first century of American cinema, with “Casablanca” attaining the numero uno position? “Gone With The Wind” and “West Side Story” come only next to it among the greatest reel classics of America.

Truly worthy of their legendary status by virtue of their sprawling, epic film romance, few would venture to dispute the position of these three films as the silver screen’s greatest romances ever. And it is worth mentioning that in each of these films, there are potent screen moments between the protagonists that are replete with romantic content which again, unmistakably evolve into meaningful, personalized fantasies among the lovers of these reel romances. Whosoever has seen “Roman Holiday” will never for his/her life forget the phenomenal scene between Audrey Hepburn and Gregory Peck when Peck puts his hand into the “Mouth of Truth” (La Bocca della Verità), a stone face in Rome that according to legend, will bite your hand off if you tell a lie. In the film, when he pulls his hand out it is missing, causing Hepburn, the disguised princess Ann, to scream hysterically. The chemistry between the two in the scene is so infectious that the audience never fails to identify the film as a superior love story with the distinction of classic romance elements.

On the other hand, those were the times that produced the ever-memorable, ever-fascinating Hollywood musicals, like the legendary “Sound of Music” (1965), “Singing in the Rain” (1952). Regarded as two of the great movie musicals of all times, these are films that linger in the hearts of lovers of romance eternally. Who can forget the sweet, ethereal chanting of Julie Andrews in “The Sound of Music” where she teaches the seven children the notes of “Do re mi” or where she asserts her individuality singing, “I have confidence in me”, or where she playfully mingles with the children in the song “These are a few of my favorite things”?

For the records, the cast album was nominated for a Grammy Award for Album of the Year, while the film itself won an Academy Award for Best Picture and is one of the most popular musicals ever produced. “Singing in the Rain”, on the other hand, starring Gene Kelly, Donald O’Connor, and Debbie Reynolds, is replete with wit as a satirical comedy, featuring one of the most lavish elements of yesteryears’ musicals. It is the film where there’s the phenomenal dance scene of Gene Kelly with the title track, “singing in the rain”, while twirling an umbrella, splashing through puddles and getting soaked to the skin. “My Fair lady”, another classic romantic comedy woven in the mould of a musical, happens to be one of my personal favorites with electrifying performances by Audrey Hepburn as Eliza Doolittle, the young, uncouth Cockney girl and Rex Harrison as Henry Higgins, an arrogant, irritable professor of phonetics. Together, they put the screen on fire with an unforgettable film adaptation of the stage musical, My Fair Lady, based in turn on the play Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw.

In the later years, to be more particular, from the nineteen hundred and seventies and eighties, there has been a noticeable transition of reel romance from the stylishly sophisticated, artsy and evocative style of the black and white years to the more bittersweet, flesh and blood world of the lovers, rocking with prolonged kissing and lovemaking scenes, unbridled energy and emotion. What can be a better example of the new cosmos in which the lovers find themselves other than that showed in “Love Story” (1970), one of the most romantic movies ever made? A romantic tearjerker from director Arthur Hiller about a passionate couple with a tragic ending, this one happens to be a heartfelt tale of the love of a lifetime. Regarded as the most successful Paramount movie up to that time, the film received seven Academy Award nominations including the Best Picture award. Another one, from the 90’s, “Forrest Gump” (1994), revives the same pristine emotions of love as the story revolves along some of the most enduring and touching moments of love between Forrest (Tom Hanks) and his lifelong love Jenny. While in the film, we have a sweeping look at thirty tumultuous years of American history seen through the eyes of the charmed simpleton Forrest, we are gifted with some classic scenes those have unparalleled intricacy and depth while still being enormously engaging. Again, in the 90’s, we see the enormously gripping passion and on-screen chemistry between Richard Gere and Julia Roberts in “Pretty Woman” (1990), a magnanimous love story about a wealthy businessman falling for effervescent hooker.

The chemistry between the lovers seemed to be so natural and convincing that it transcends the shackles of a romantic comedy and goes on to be remembered as quite a classic film in the romance genre. Towards the end of the 90’s, the world of romance in Hollywood was again ablaze with the blockbuster of all times, “Titanic” (1997), a fictional love story between Rose (Kate Winslett) and Jack (Leonardo De Caprio), members of different social classes who fall in love aboard the ill-fated 1912 maiden voyage of the ship Titanic. Even though the film is based on the historical sinking of the gigantic Titanic, the crux and the beauty of the entire film lies in the poignant tale of their love which is even more beautified by the soulful music and memorable soundtracks of the film. On a different note, though with the same poignancy and intensity of passion, unfolds the idyllic love story between Noah (Ryan Gosling) and his love Allie (Rachel McAdams) in “the Notebook” (2004). Adapted from the 1996 romantic novel by Nicolas Sparks, it has been one of the most touching screen romances of the present times.

Last but not the least; let me share with you my feelings of witnessing another classic film outside of Hollywood that portrayed romance on screen so evocatively yet with a poignant tone that I was immediately reminded of the classic undertones of creative suggestiveness and subtlety characteristic of the celebrated reel romances of Hollywood. The film is none other than the Italian masterpiece “La Vita E Belle” (“Life is Beautiful”) directed by Roberto Benigni which went on to win 3 Oscars in 1998. While the film was based on the story of the violent indignities suffered by Jews in the concentration camps of World War II, the subtleties of the film transcend the horrors of the concentration camp with some of the most beautifully screened romantic sequences in world cinema.

Remember the scene where Guido follows his bride Dora into a greenhouse and the scenes which follow thereafter? Well, rather than showing what they do there, the scene slowly dissolves to a shot of the same greenhouse, only this time, a little boy is playing there. The implications are obvious, the device serves to advance the plot a few years without restoring to the clichéd “five years later…” inter-title and the love scene is left to the audience’s imagination. By virtue of the amazing screenplay, the film turns out to be an unforgettable fable that proves the indomitable spirit of love, family and imagination in the face of all evils. Undoubtedly, this, along with the joys of love, and life–has been the most enduring theory working as the ultimate foundation behind all successful romance classics in the history of Hollywood! And so, be it in “Casablanca” or in “The Notebook”, both ‘cupid’ and ‘life’ rule! For, all quintessential romances are a celebration of life in its varied hues. Struck by cupid’s arrows, it becomes ever more beautiful and transcendental by all means!

How Important Of A Role Does Translation Play In A Movie

Movies have always occupied an important part in the lives of people. Not only have they been used as a great source of entertainment for people of all ages, but they have also been used to share thoughts and ideas on a larger platform. Many famous books have been made into movies. Hollywood is the most well-known movie industry, as its movies are shown in countries all over the world. Along with it, almost every country has its own movie industry which produces movies for its population in its own language. However, all over the world, both English and non-English speaking, people enjoy watching Hollywood movies, as they are considered to provide the best entertainment.

With this rising demand for English movies in non-English speaking countries, a large translation industry has arisen. Movie makers find this beneficial, as they are able to sell their movies to a much larger group of people. This translation takes place in two ways; either it is done with subtitles of the dialogues appearing at the bottom of the screen or it is done with overdubs. Many people do not prefer subtitles, as they find it stressful to constantly read the dialogues said by the actors, while some people do not like overdubs as the dialogues and the mouth movements do not match.

Even many times the quality of the translation plays a major role in how well the movie gets received. Some translations are done very well, maintaining the integrity of the dialogue, while some are just downright hilarious and some others just do not seem to make any sense. These translations do not take into account the context in which the dialogue is being spoken and just literally translate the dialogue, causing hilarious results. If done carefully, then movie translations can provide the required boost to the career of an individual, as it is a great learning experience. It allows a translator to become a part of movie industry, while showcasing his skills. The only requirement is to do the translations in accordance with the emotions and passion of the actor.

It is not only movies, where translations are required, but even in the news industry the information is taken and translated into various languages to ensure that the information is passed on to as many people as possible. Many times overdubs are done when news is televised for understanding of all the people.